Co-Creation

Lately, I have noticed that the creator puts everything I need out on the canvas (painting) for the day. Thought the canvas is blank, Creator gives me the brushes, paints, easel, chair, water, lunch and sets it all up with a beautiful view for me to just paint what I see, what I feel into being. So simple, but most days I do not even notice I am so caught up with what I think I need. If I needed groceries I could just paint them into existence. Like the ancient people painting the buffalos on cave walls with arrows through them, conjuring the food their people needed already dead and all they need to do is walk out of the cave and find where it lays, honor the buffalo and pack it home to the people, that easy, effortless. Each day I pray to the Creator to assist me to understand this, to guide and aid my hands to paint that which I need, that which others need, that which my Mother Earth needs and all beings upon her. I know Creator does not care if the image on the painting looks like the image in my head, Creator knows what I am getting at, it is about meeting Creator halfway, working with Creator, to create as a co-creator for the good of all, for all my relations. As co-creator I am responsible for all life here on earth that does not have the hands to paint, it is up to me to communicate with the tree beings to understand their needs and to get an image in my head to paint onto the canvas for their good. Co-creating with Creator the holographic images into the mind field and painted onto physical, emotional canvas effortlessly bringing into this reality what the image bares.

In Service to All My Relations, She Walks Among Stars

A Prayer for All

You can Release humanity for jail. Every person I reboot changes, their torus filed awakens and begins to pulsate again with the energy of the all and the everything. Trauma, illness, fear, numbness, abuse, violence, destruction, can be reset to peace, health, cure, some take more sessions than other depending on the levels it has been imbedded. Like front line war…can be.

I heal people and release them from the nutrient depleted jail of the sick and die’ing body into vitality, youth, joy.

I heal then by rebooting them, correcting the dis-ease that has taken hold of their minds, emotions, body, and spirit, returning them far beyond before they came here.

We just accept so much and give up on ourselves.

I keep releasing them as the come, with love, compassion, hope, belief in what my abilities are, the gifts I have from my star family to raise the dead if necessary….

Illness, disease, emotional disorders,  mental chemistry, abuse…Those are the real jails that people, humans need to be released from. Once they begin to be released, then they have the potential to make a difference and they can cope with anything, even be in love and grace while the worst is facing them. That is the real deal and real release of such jails…

I ask the Creator now, the creator of all things. I call in all the Grandmothers and Grandfathers from all directions. I call forth the power of Creation. I ask that all who read this be released from their deepest prison, jail now!

I ask for self-righteousness to leave those that have it, now!

I ask that humanity is returned together to the All, All my relations and begin to learn what co-creation means with the all, with ourselves and all living beings on the mother earth and in her, now!

We are freed Now! You are freed Now! The Mother is Freed NOW! All beings in her and on her are Freed now! The water is Freed Now! The soil is Freed Now! The air Is Freed Now!

We no longer need the expression, the release of the jail by the beautiful yellow stone volcano, Let her lay in peace, she is freed from the releasing of humanity from the jail, I will take this task on, in a good way, NOW!

I ask Creator, the creator of everything that all this be done in a good way, on the good path, on the good red road, that I follow for the good of all my relations.

AND SO IT IS NOW!

Bridgette Lyn Dolgoff

Bozeman Montana Summer 2017 Phenomenology Classes

Phenomenology Course (Goethe, Nature and Phenomenology)

Phenomenology is the exploration and description of phenomena, where phenomena are the things or experiences as human beings experience them. Phenomenology is a science of beginnings that demands a thorough, in-depth study of the phenomenon, which must be seen and described as clearly as possible. Accurate description is not a phenomenological end, however, but a means by which the phenomenologist locates the phenomenon’s deeper, more generalizable patterns, structures, and meanings. Rephrased in phenomenological language, Goethe’s way of science is one early example of a phenomenology of the natural world. He sought a way to open himself to the things of nature, to listen to what they said, and to identify their core aspects and qualities. Phenomenology is an approach to science that studies the world through what we as humans can directly observe and experience using multiple tools that use a whole brain approach. In these studies of nature, we will see the plant as a whole, and in the parts, we can see with our naked eyes. In so doing, we learn the true essence of nature. In this phenomenology study of nature, we need to cultivate the ability to let thoughts dissolve and experience, for instance, the plant kingdom as just the thing-in-itself. We need to be active in not doing, and allow the plant, tree, bee or soil to speak. It will tell us all the mysteries of its life, and ultimately, the truths of existence. It is an elegant and beautiful view of the study of nature.

This class is in partnership between the New Waldorf early childhood school opening in Bozeman Montana https://www.worldfamilyschool.org/ in September 2017 and Bridgette Lyn Dolgoff and her Urban Farm Project who will be in Bozeman from mid-July to mid-September 2017.

1) Phenomenology of Plants Saturday, August 12, 2017. 1439 W. Babckok St, Bozeman, Montana 59715, the class will be from 10 am to 12 pm, notepad, art paper, pencils, crayons to draw with and take notes. $15 per person and $20 per family.

2) Phenomenology of Trees Saturday, August 19, 2017. 1439 W. Babckok St, Bozeman, Montana 59715, the class will be from 10 am to 12 pm, notepad, art paper, pencils, crayons to draw with and take notes. $15 per person and $20 per family.

3) Phenomenology of Leaves Saturday, August 26, 2017. 1439 W. Babckok St, Bozeman, Montana, the class will be from 10 am to 12 pm, notepad, art paper, pencils, crayons to draw with and take notes. $15 per person and $20 per family.

Bridgette Lyn Dolgoff has been a lifetime student & practitioner of Shamanism. She is a Sustainable, Biodynamic farmer over the last 7 years has built individual family backyard food productions. She attended Steiner College. The Urban Farm Project was founded by Bridgette in 2009. UFP’s focus is consulting, building, education, in the community on our return back to our Earth Mother and All Our Relations.

Contact Bridgette at consciousnessofeconomics.com or 775.624.7862

Fall 2016 long distance Multidimensional Healing Special

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“I cured with the power that came through me. Of course, it was not I who cured, it was the power from the Outer World, the visions and the ceremonies had only made me like a hole through which the power could come to the two-leggeds.”

Black Elk

October 2016 ~ December 2016 Online Special

Health & Nutritional Consulting, Energy Healing & Readings

Life & Business Coaching

and More……

Online sessions usually run $125; with Fall Special individual sessions are discounted at $100 or you can get a package of three sessions for $230 until end of December 2016. All Fall Special Sessions done by appointment on Skype video call. These sessions can make great gifts for the holiday session, birthdays, and anniversaries or for condolences. All sessions are based from a multidimensional perspective.

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Bridgette Lyn Dolgoff has had a private practice in Energy & Structural Medicine for over 25 years working on humans and animals. Her shamanism work takes her into the 64 dimensional layers accessing information and healing energies. Bridgette specializes in her own formats, structures, practices in Shamanism utilizing Fire & Snake Medicine and Transmutation as well as structural medicine. Her Shamanism work also involves Earth healing, energy grid adjustments, ceremonies, working with communities through educating and reversing our programmed thinking about the world we live in. Bridgette is also a sustainable Biodynamic farmer educating about our spiritual return back to Earth. She brings insights on how to work with the medicine of earth in systems of recovery and restoration for the health of our bodies, soil, water, air, plants life and animals. Her offerings include workshops, webinars and classes, lecturing, consulting, coaching, with a special intent for hands on building and development. She is registered with the International Association of Medical Intuitives.

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For more information please contact Bridgette at the Ministry Of Consciousness http://ministryofconsciousnessnevada.org/

31 Long-Forgotten Native American Medical Cures

When it comes to herbal remedies, many of us are familiar with the benefits of Echinacea or purple cone flower as an antibiotic, willow bark as a pain killer and aloe as a topical anesthetic and treatment for skin conditions. But that’s common knowledge compared to the insights and treatments that Native American medicine men discovered and used.

Native American medicine men developed a wheel very similar to the yin/yang of Asian medicine. The use of herbal remedies and other alternative forms of treatment was the cutting-edge medicine of their day. This was a holistic approach to medical treatment that relied heavily on plants and their unique benefits.

What follows is list of indigenous plants, trees, fruits and flowers unique to North America that have surprising benefits as defined by Native American tribes. If and when times are tough, it might be good to keep some of these ancient cures in mind. They also are good for everyday needs when you consider how effective some of them can be.

Licorice tea for a sore throat is a good example. It’s also interesting that many of these natural cures are still in use today, including beeswax and bee pollen, chamomile and others. It’s a good demonstration of the benefit of wisdom developed over centuries.

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It’s hard to know how Native Americans determined which plants might have medicinal properties, although trial and error was probably one approach. It’s also thought that they observed sick animals eating certain plants and determined that those plants must have a certain property worth exploring.  Since that time,scientific studies have verified the medicinal value of many plants. In fact, common aspirin is derived from salicin, a chemical in the inner bark of willow trees that was used in ancient times for fever and pain.

These medicines were usually administered via teas or pastes that were either ingested or applied externally. Sometimes the plants were eaten as food or added to food or water. On occasion, a salve or poultice was applied to open wounds. I would strongly recommend that you avoid the latter, given the risk of infection from wild sources.

I’ve omitted many of the natural remedies. There was a use for mistletoe that I came across, but mistletoe is essentially poisonous and if not used properly the results could be counter-productive, if not deadly.

I’ve also found a great deal of redundancy. It seems like everything is good for a cough or diarrhea. Rather than endlessly list plants that cure the same conditions over and over, I’ve tried to isolate this grouping to the most prevalent plants that you may find and recognize. As always, if you are pregnant, check with your doctor and do plenty of research before using any of these.

Here’s the list:

1. Alfalfa: Relieves digestion and is used to aid blood clotting. Contemporary uses included treatment of arthritis, bladder and kidney conditions and bone strength. Enhances the immune system.


3. Aspen
: The inner bark or xylem is used in a tea to treat fever, coughs and pain. It contains salicin, which also is found in willow trees and is the foundation ingredient for aspirin.

2. Aloe: A cactus-like plant. The thick leaves can be squeezed to extrude a thick sap that can be used to treat burns, insect bites and wounds.

4. Bee pollen: When mixed with food it can boost energy, aid digestion and enhance the immune system. If you’re allergic to bee stings you will most likely be allergic to bee pollen.

5. Beeswax: Used as a salve for burns and insect bites, including bee stings. Intended to only be used externally.

6. Blackberry: The root, bark and leaves when crushed and infused in a tea are used to treat diarrhea, reduce inflammation and stimulate the metabolism. As a gargle it treats sore throats, mouth ulcers and inflammation of the gums.

7. Black Raspberry: The roots of this plant are crushed and used as a tea or boiled and chewed to relieve coughs, diarrhea and general intestinal distress.

8. Buckwheat: The seeds are used in soups and as porridge to lower blood pressure, help with blood clotting and relieve diarrhea.

9. Cayenne: The pods are used as a pain reliever when taken with food or drunk in a tea. Also used to threat arthritis and digestive distress. It is sometimes applied to wounds as a powder to increase blood flow and act as an antiseptic and anesthetic to numb the pain.

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10. Chamomile: The leaves and flowers are used as a tea to treat intestinal problems and nausea.

11. Chokecherry: Considered by Native American tribes as an all-purpose medicinal treatment, the berries were pitted, dried and crushed into a tea or a poultice to treat a variety of ailments. These include coughs, colds, flu, nausea, inflammation and diarrhea. As a salve or poultice it is used to treat burns and wounds. The pit of the chokecherry – much like apple seeds – are poisonous in high concentrations. Be sure to pit the cherries if you’re considering this for any use.

13. Eucalyptus: The oil from the leaves and roots is a common treatment when infused in a tea to treat coughs, sore-throat, flu and fever. It’s used to this day as an ingredient in cough drops.

12. Echinacea: Also known as purple coneflower, this is a classic Native American medicine that is used to strengthen the immune system, fight infections and fever. It also is used as an antiseptic and general treatment for colds, coughs and flu.

14. Fennel: A plant with a licorice flavor, this is used in a tea or chewed to relieve coughs, sore-throat, aid digestion, offer relief to diarrhea and was a general treatment for colds. It also is used as a poultice for eye relief and headaches.

15. Feverfew: Used to this day as a natural relief for fever and headaches – including severe headaches like migraines – it also can be used for digestive problems, asthma and muscle and joint pains.

16. Feverwort: Another fever remedy that also is used for general pain, itching and joint stiffness. It can be ingested as a tea or chewed, or crushed to a paste as a salve or poultice.

17. Ginger root: Another super plant in Native American medicine, the root was crushed and consumed with food, as a tea or a salve or poultice. Known to this day for its ability to aid digestive health, it also is anti-inflammatory, aids circulation and can relieve colds, coughs and flu, in addition to bronchitis and joint pain.

18. Ginseng: This is another contemporary herb that has a history that goes back across cultures for millennia. The roots were used by Native Americans as a food additive, a tea and a poultice to treat fatigue, boost energy, enhance the immune system and help with overall liver and lung function. The leaves and stems also were used, but the root has the most concentration of active ingredients.

19. Goldenrod: Commonly thought of today as a source of allergies and sneezing, it was actually considered another all-in-one medicine by Native Americans. As a tea, an addition to food and a topical salve, it is used to treat conditions from bronchitis and chest congestion to colds, flu, inflammation, sore throats and as an antiseptic for cuts and abrasions.

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20. Honeysuckle: The berries, stems, flowers and leaves are used to topically treat bee stings and skin infections. As a tea, it is used to treat colds, headaches and sore throat. It also has anti-inflammatory properties.

21. Hops: As a tea it is used to treat digestive problems and often mixed with other herbs or plants, such as aloe, to soothe muscles. It also is used to soothe toothaches and sore throat.

22. Licorice: Roots and leaves can be used for coughs, colds, sore throats. The root also can be chewed to relieve toothaches.

23. Mullein: As an infusion in tea or added to a salad or other food, this is a plant that has been used by Native Americans to treat inflammation, coughs and congestion and general lung afflictions. It is quite common and you probably have it growing in your backyard or somewhere close.

24. Passion flower: The leaves and roots are used to make a tea to treat anxiety and muscle pain. A poultice for injuries to the skin such as burns, insect bites and boils also can be made from passion flower.

25. Red clover: It grows everywhere and the flowers, leaves and roots are usually infused in a tea or are used to top food. It is used to manage inflammation, improve circulation and treat respiratory conditions.

26. Rose hip: This is the red to orange berry that is the fruit of wild roses. It is already known to be a massive source of vitamin C and when eaten whole, crushed into a tea or added to food it is used to treat colds and coughs, intestinal distress, as an antiseptic and to treat inflammation.

27. Rosemary: A member of the pine family and used in food and as a tea to treat muscle pain, improve circulation and as a general cleanser for the metabolism.

28. Sage: A far-reaching shrub across much of North America, it is a natural insect repellent and can be used for the standard list of digestive disorders, colds and sore throat.

29. Spearmint: Used consistently by Native American tribes for treatment of coughs, colds, respiratory distress and as a cure for diarrhea and a stimulant for blood circulation.

30. Valerian: The root as an infusion in a tea relieves muscle aches, pain and is said to have a calming effect.

31. White Pine: Ubiquitous and the needles and the inner bark can be infused in a tea. Used as a standard treatment for respiratory distress and chest congestion.

http://www.offthegridnews.com/alternative-health/31-long-forgotten-native-american-medical-cures/